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germany, make it hard for them to accept tougher economic sanctions. but this is where you need american leadership. the fact is that what putin has succeeded in doing is using military force to change international boundaries on the continent of europe. and if the europeans don't realize it, that puts them in considerable jeopardy. the european union is still on very shaky foundations when it comes to the monetary union, political tensions are rising. and putin is taking advantage of them. i think this is a very bad time for the western alliances. >> right. and historically, we have seen this happen in the past, going back to world war ii, beginning stages of that. let's go further. what does the united states have to do to show american leadership and intervene in this difficult situation in ukraine and russia? >> well, i think you've got to do two things. number one, you've got to turn up the cost to russia of this belligerent policy its pursuing. if the europeans are serious about wanting peace and stability on the european continent, they've got to risk economic harm to themselves i
by the principle that europe, germany, and united states could not wish for a more reliable partner respectively than we have in the transatlantic alliance. the alliance is a prime importance to all of us and this is the basis for our very close economic cooperation as well. the transatlantic economic the whole 15ure on million jobs on that side of the atlantic. it is indispensable. german companies alone a great in more than 600,000 jobs over haveand american companies created 800,000 jobs as of now. the u.s. chamber of commerce is an eloquent testament to these very close integrations of our tool economic areas. the world has changed incredibly. you have more of a political and theomic weight of economies, the overall framework of the g 20. the global financial and economic crisis as greatly impaired progress and growth in the countries which has a lasting impact. globally, we see a tightening of growth which is something we are very pleased to. of imf is excepting growth 3.6% and next year to 3.9%. reason for usbe a to be complacent. in europe and the united states, just as other industrializ
with germany and the transatlantic trade and investment partnership. this is an hour. >> please welcome dr. angela merkel. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the chamber of commerce of the united states. period is tom donohue am the president and ceo of the spine institution. i would like to extend a special welcome to those of you visiting our headquarters for the first time. the chamber is a 102-year-old organization. this building serves as a central rallying point for the ..s. business community we host several hundred meetings here in this room alone every year. room we are gathered in today, the international hall of flags, is rich in symbolism and history. afterom takes its name the overhead banners of 12 great explorers who blazed the first paths of trade. they planted the first seeds of commercial and industrial growth in the new world. these flags remind us that the transatlantic relationship has been around for a long time. today, we are reminded just how essential this relationship is. alliance is.-eu critical to global stability, peace, and freedom. this has been p
merkel, chancellor of germany is visiting today. the most productive country in europe. 40% of young people in apprenticeship programs. it has no minimum wage. in fact, if you look at western europe as a group, the countries that have a minimum wage have 13.8% unemployment. the countries with no minimum wage, and these are, by the way, higher income countries. these are norway, sweden, austria, germany. they have 6.3% unemployment. what's wrong with this country? here are countries that say we're going to be economically productive. they have half the unemployment rate of the countries that have a social welfare state. what am i missing here? >> one, i lived in england for two years. i know great britain and know europe very well. what you're missing is they have a safety net, first of all. they have universal health care. day have -- young people have access to education. cost of housing is much lower. their governments ensure that there's a minimum standard of living and, in fact, the unemployment compensation is there for them. in fact -- >> i'm going to shock you, too. i think ca
the u.s. and germany united and sent another stern warning to moscow. >> we are united in our determination to impose costs on russia for its actions as ukrainian forces move to restore order in eastern ukraine, it is obvious to the world that these russian-backed groups are not peaceful protesters but heavily armed militants receiving significant support from russia. >> times are also tense with ukrainian army launching the first major assault on separatist strong holds in the east of that country. a spokesman for putin called the move a criminal act. nbc news chief white house correspondent chuck todd, also host of "the daily rundown" joins us. how critical was it for the president to get merkel on board with sanctions? >> reporter: it's interesting, that is a glass is half full way of looking at it. here's what clearly they agree to. they have the next deadline that they've set to decide whether to do another round of sanctions and that is the may 25th election. you heard the president essentially say if russia destabilizing the situation, makes -- tries to mess with this e
at the u.s. chamber of commerce and she will be focusing her comments on u.s. trade relations with germany. >> republic of germany. >> good morning, everybody. pleasure to a great welcome my friend, chancellor house. to the white germany is one of our strongest allies, and angela is one of my closest partners. and with her indulgence, i want to start by making two brief, comments. first, as president, my top priority is doing everything we can to create more jobs and opportunities for hard-working families for our economic strength as a source of strength in the world. this morning, we learned that our businesses created 273,000 new jobs last month. all told, our businesses have now created 9.2 million new jobs over 50 consecutive months of job growth. the grit and determination of the american people are moving us forward, but we have to keep a relentless focus on job creation and creating more opportunities for working families. there is plenty more that congress should be doing, from raising the minimum wage to --ating good restriction good construction jobs rebuilding america. i want t
. it is a very strong economic relationship between germany and russia. including former german chancellor, who is making a lot of money helping natural gas flow from russia to germany. no surprise. angela merkel is under pressure. host: one of the fundamental flaws of sanctions as a foreign-policy tool? guest: it is limited and a blunt instrument but also there is no other choice. not a lot of other alternatives. politics are flawed, too. germany is russia's's largest trading partner in the eu. they have more economic interest in the u.s. and its owing to be hard to pressure russia and a major way unless the europeans are willing to play. host: let me share what jack lew told members of congress when it came to sanctions and at russia and the wealthy individuals linked to president putin. [video clip] >> if you look at the impact on russia's economy, it is misleading to look at what happens day by day. you have to look over the period of time since russia went into crimea and since we have imposed sanctions. there has been a substantial deterioration in rush's already weak economy. we see and
point ceases to be in the interests of the german government. germany gets a third of its oil and gas from russia and some of germany's best-known companies, volkswagen for one, have huge stakes in russia. so any type of sanction has a potential economic blowback and it's just a sign of how the west has a limited toolbox in dealing with the situation in ukraine, chris. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for the reporting. >>> let's bring in cnn military analyst james "spider" marks a retired major generally and former commanding general of the u.s. army intillgence center. general, thank you for joining us. let's leave the politics aside and deal with the urgency on the ground. what do you believe the situation is? who is ukraine fighting? what do you think the stakes are? >> fighting two elements really. you do have pro-russian separatists that are in east ukraine, but they're being supported directly, not only in terms of what i would call over-the-horizon support, weapons support, but also they have russian forces are on the ground instigating this and these are the folks we've
and 12th? >> at home until i was recalled. >> the operations center in germany. you were in the room. >> yes. >> you were able to see, hear, feel, understand what was going on in that room? >> we worked toward understanding, yes, sir. >> were you ever interviewed by the accountability review board? >> no, sir. >> your primary responsibility was to try -- "j two was focused on attribution, that attacks became a german will very soon after the event." what do you believe they were attributable to? >> an islamist extremist group. >> al qaeda? >> we felt it was ansaria. >> affiliated with al qaeda. >> yes. >> aqim, were they involved? >> aas is who we looked at. >> how quickly did you come to the conclusion that you believed there were al qaeda affiliates or al qaeda themselves involved engaged in the attack? >> very soon in the early hours of the activity. >> was it a video? >> no, sir. >> did it spark a protest? >> no, sir. >> i want to get the facts at a time. the cia station chief is quoted as saying, "not not an escalation a protest." would you agree or disagree with the cia station
that killed four americans, including the u.s. ambassador to libya. general lovell was in germany awaiting orders to strike at the terrorists, orders that never came. >> what we did know quite early on is that this was a hostile action. this was no demonstration gone terribly awry. to the point of what happened, the facts led to the conclusion of a terrorist attack. the afri-con j 2 was focused on attribution. the attacks became attributable very soon after the event. >> so that means the u.s. military, the cia on the ground in libya, and pretty much everyone else directly involved with the benghazi attack knew it was not a spontaneous demonstration within hours. yet, as we proved yesterday, the obama administration created a fiction that the attack was a reaction to an anti-muslim videotape. the cover was blown off that deception this week when a memo by white house advisor ben rhodes was released through the freedom of information act. the memo clearly says that ambassador susan rice was prepped to tell the world on television that a videotape incited the murders in benghazi. incredibly,
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world world war with the sense of them being a rising power but with the grievance that they would soon be into position to correct in some way. now that doesn't mean conflict is inevitable but the decisions over the maritime disputes you felt the chance of to improve. >> the trip i took in march was my 9th trip there. and it was a great quote that i would like to point out from a debate from two people of letters. i will not go into their names. they were arguing about china and one was living there for a couple years and there other returned. and the guy who had not said the guy who lived there was too close to china and the guy responded surely there is a medium between never -- living in china versus never being there at all. that guy had never been there at all. i can tell you every time i go i learn how much i don't know and how much is changing in china. i would be concerned about china's economic rise if it doesn't happen. and that is because the imperative i think from the comm commonnist party is if they
there. third, the largest supply of natural gas going into germany, and other eurtugal countries, they can't handle the tough sanctions if russia puts a stop to their natural gas. forthhough poland and so is tracking -- fracking a lot more. russia is the main gas supplier. we have to learn how to trade with them. of the gasesng rid from syria. they are trying to help. buy people with uneven vinegar. congress is thinking the old , back in theods 50's and 60's. it is a different time now. we are doing trade with china. but we are not doing anything with russia. they are the second strongest power in the world, and they could nuke us right off the planet. steve, what are you proposing, then? more diplomatic outreach with russia? more trade? caller: give the more say so in the g-8. wantger trade ties that we in the far east. things they want in europe and so forth. it is basic math and principles. let me bounce a few things off of you from what you said. here's daniel sanford. he covers russia, moscow for the bbc. he put this out. map of the day from the shell brochure. look at the m
back to the history books and what things were like in germany before world war i. of germany being a rising power but with historical grievances that they would soon be in a position to correct in some way. that does not mean conflict is inevitable. the tensions over the various maritime disputes and the other you really felt the potential for increasing amounts of conflict. >> you have been following this for a long time, your thoughts? >> the trip i took in march was my night trip to china between the u.s. china working group. it was a great quote i like to point out from a debate that took place between two people of letters well known in the d c area. they were arguing about china, one had been living there for a couple years and returned and the other had not. the guy who had not said the guy who had been there was too close to china. and he could not be objective about his views and the guy responded by saying surely there is a happy medium between having lived in china and having never been there at all. that put the guy in his place, he had never been there at all. i don't
and germany. >> what do you think of germany? >> i like it. i have been there nine years and longest i lived anywhere. i consider germany my home in a weird way. and it's definitely a mind-opening experience for me and it's changed my perspective on a national level for the country and also on an international level as well. >> what's your favorite german word? >> oh, that's a good one. probably bergermeister. >> and the bill you want passed. >> i would go along the lines with everyone else, it seems an education bill. living in a military community i have seen the effects transferring through multiple school systems has on students and how the lack of standardization and common goals for education have on students and their futures. >> let's go back in the back here. people we have not been able to talk to. yes, sir. >> my name is daniel rose and i'm the delegate from tennessee. >> where in tennessee? >> memphis. >> the bill i would pass is definitely an immigration reform bill. just looking around the room and being able to talk to every single one of these delegates has been just an aspir
of germany from the dasm which was down 2%. and of course germany is most exposed immediately through the situation in ukraine. sanctions will perhaps hit russia. >> the energy more than anything else. >> as much as energy. germany exports an enormous of its good through russia. there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is being disrupted. so that's an issue. >> there's a close economic relationship. and if you start disrupting that then a major source for income for germany is but what really? s it really pay-back time as russia would like to put it because of what happened in the 90s and the collapse of the soviet union that we were allowed to go in and take over places of raugs russian strategic influence and was able to do that fairly in a cavalier way that now it's time that mr. putin says enough is enough? >> i worked in germany in that period of time. and was there in 1990 when german unification came about. and the soviet union collapsed. and nobody at that time would have imagined that nato would extend
for the investigation. now to the crisis in ukraine. pro-russian supporters took over a television station. germany is condemning the parading of european observers kidnapped on friday. pro-russian militias released one, several others are in custody. russian militia captured three ukrainian special forces officers and they, too, were shown to the media. barnaby phillips has more from near donetsk in eastern ukraine. >> reporter: the european military observers were paraded before cameras by the self-ponded major -- appointed mayor of slovyansk, vechislav ponomaryov. they are in no position to complain about what happened to them. >> we are not prisoners of war, but the guests of mayor vechislav ponomaryov, and are treated as such. >> at least they were able to show their families they are alive and well. later, one observer from swedeb was released on the grounds of you will health. others have not been treated so kindly. these three men were captured by pro-russian government need slovyansk. ukrainian intelligence officers, and this is what they locked like after the interrogation. >> on the road
of the day we need germany with the u.s. working together. because right now the europeans get 50% of their oil from russia. >> germany needs natural gas. >> they're not going to do it. >> at the end of the day, these sanctions to be most powerful have to be collective. the g7 came out with an announcement last night -- i think two nights ago. which looks like there would be an upcoming collective sanction. we need that to be real and to stick. i would challenge whether we see that. >> putin holds a lot of the cards here. >> exactly. >> he controls energy supplies and also supplies of metals. boeing has huge composure in the form of titanium. it doesn't look like the western world will push him very hard. can i talk about another failure? >> real quick. >> the president was in asia, he was in south korea. this doesn't have to deal with economics or business. it sure would have been nice to see him talking about human rights in north korea. the atrocities that are going on in north korea, the president had a chance to talk about that. >> what a point. >> i didn't see anything. >> w
you look at those other countries in terms of minimum wage and things like that, germany has no minimum wage. their unemployment is 8%. france has a big minimum wage and their youth unemployment is 20%. >> we have an experiment here in the united states because each state tries a different pattern. we see illinois and california raising taxes and we see wisconsin and texas lowering regulations and taxes. it's the latter two that are doing better than the former two. >> that's right. the example i think your citing is texas. a lot of the net new job versus been created in texas. >> let's spell it out. one third of all new created over the past ten years have been created in texas and they have been dramatically lowering regulations in texas. >> plus the legislature in the state meets every other year. that's a great idea. and also add to the list that steve rightfully put forgot. >> he cut taxes in half. he cut government spending in half and the economy, boom, grew 7% a year under calvin coolidge. tell me which hike creates a middle class job and the interesting statistic. >>
the hearts of men. >> solar number is grown up. it's still got a long way to go. >> germany ranks number one for using the most solar energy, and the u.s. number four. >>> a waiter needs good coordinationing speed and buenos aires puts its waiters to the test. daniel schweimler reports on the art of waiting tables. >> reporter: efficiency, poise and grace are three of the virtuous required. they were all on display at the 10th annual race for waiters and waite reses in the heart of buenos aires. >> dante is a previous winner, with more than 30 years in the job, he knows what is required. >> translation: a good waiter must be friendly, respond rapidly and treat the customers as well as possible, always with a smile they are the main characteristics of a good waiter. >> he's worked at the bar in the legal district serving lawyers and judges for two decades, a profession he loves, because he numbers dealing with the public. an often mallined profession. some practice it with a certain alt of style -- amount of style and pan ash. nowhere is the art of waiting a table better preserved than here i
of the dignitaries from southern germany, which would be very catholic. you've also got parts of england, ireland, all of those countries. of course, latin america. the gentleman standing behind pope francis is archbishop gainsfind. he was the assistant to pope benedict as well and elevated to archbishop. now he's the assistant to pope francis, and so when you see pope francis at a public event, you'll see archbishop gainsfind. if you see pope benedict at an event, which i did in january, archbishop gainsfind is there. he's the go-between. once you know him, you know both popes. >> this ceremony got started at 10:00 local time and lasted two hours there. pope francis is going down and doing what he's doing, shaking every day people's hands. when he became pope, wearing the wooden cross. what sticks out to you in the ceremony today as you've been watching the last couple hours? >> what sticks out to me is how formal it is. pope francis is keeping this warm right now. i don't think we'll see him do any selfies today. i don't think that's part of the program. but i do think you'll see, what you won'
's mexico. there's croatia. you see an american flag. of course, germany. holland, of course, scotland i'm being told. >> there are so many people in that square in italy, we're having trouble hearing him. we're going to come back to him during the 3:00 hour for more. msnbc will have full coverage of tomorrow's services beginning at 4:00 a.m. eastern time. >>> one school for special kids, another for regular ones. for many, that's the rub with charter schools. is it really as simple as that? we're going to take a look at that. first, though, it's being billed as nine acres of guns under one roof. close to 80,000 people are expected at this week's nra annual convention. how anti-gun activists are fighting back. this is msnbc. salesperson #1: so, again, throwing in the $1,000 fuel reward card is really what makes it like two deals in one. salesperson #2: actually, getting a great car with 42 highway miles per gallon makes it like two deals in one. salesperson #1: point is there's never been a better time to buy a jetta tdi clean diesel. avo: during the first ever volkswagen tdi clean diese
and i remember seeing him when i was a soldier serving in germany. and i stood in ankle-deep mud taking pictures of him for the newspaper for the eighth army infantry division, and i was astounded and enthralled with his deliverance. he was so, so much a man of the people. >> yeah. there was something remarkable about seeing pope john paul ii in person. and you could make the argument he was live and in person by more people around the world than any human being in history. his travels across the globe, he was someone who a lot of people came to see and flocked to see. and there was always this sort of gravitas about him. one of the times i got to see him was actually at the bee at occasion of pope john xxiii. and what was remarkable, there is something about john paul ii, and that something, i think, is what's being recognized tomorrow in both of these men. they're not being made saints because of their accomplishments as pope or because of the things they wrote or said. they're being cannonized, because the church recognizes what is already the case. that these were holy men, and that
's one in germany. there's only two really that would be available. >> thank you so much for your time. appreciate that. >> all right. >>> a teenager was stabbed to death in the stairwell of her high school on prom day. the stunned student body and police. they all want to know why. all stations come over to mission a for a final go. this is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> investigators in connecticut are trying to figure out the motive behind a deadly attack on a 16-year-old honors student. it happened yesterday at a school in milford. just about 20 miles away from newtown. police say a classmate slashed maren sanchez to death in a school stairwell. this is heartbreaking. what happened? >> she was a very popular girl. we're hearing a lot on social media from her friends and family. at about 7:00 a.m. this all unfolded in the stair
obama convened a conference call with the leaders of france germany, great britain and italy to discuss the next steps against russia at the situation in ukraine grows ever more chaotic. in the end, no new economic sanctions came but the united states may hit russia with targeted sanctions in the very near future. but mr. obama wants to wait for european unity before trying to strike a blow against key sectors of the russian economy. here in seoul, south korea, president park warned north korea could conduct another nuclear weapons test at any moment. president obama called the dictatorship's foreign professional irresponsible and provocative and the u.s. is leaning hard on north korea to give up its nuclear weapons program. for "cbs this morning saturday," major garrett, seoul, south korea. >>> pressure is building in ukraine this weekend as separatists are now holding a group of european military observers, and concerns are increasing about a possible invasion. as russian troops continue exercises along the border. more from holly williams in done
quickly. you see some of the european economies are very tied to guest problems. germany has a pipeline underneath the baltics to connect directly to russia. i think that is one of the reasons you will see germany they do getnt -- their money from -- 40% of their gas from russia. the u.s. and russian economy is not nearly as integrated. there is certainly a love for he that it can cause us and european allies a lot of .inancial distress host: are we developing the infrastructure -- guest: i believe there are five or six lng terminal points. only one of those in louisiana is currently under construction. we are a long ways out from making the u.s. export industry to where we can help our allies in europe. opened a have recently liquefied terminal. we are equal to get fish eager get ---- we are eager to a lot of them are buying gas from russians. all of these countries are coming to us and saying, look, we are interested in buying energy resources but the problem is we are at least 10 years out from being able to fulfill the requests. host: we are talking with hannah thoburn from the fore
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)